News
23/3/2018

DCEXS-UPF: A peptide present in the rattlesnaken venom could kill super resistant bacteria

DCEXS-UPF: A peptide present in the rattlesnaken venom could kill super resistant bacteria


News from DCEXS-UPF


A fragment of the peptide crotalidicin, isolated from the venom of a South American rattlesnake, has shown its ability to kill bacteria without affecting healthy cells. This discovery, according to the researcher Sónia Troeira Henriques, of the Institute for Molecular Bioscience at the University of Queensland, Australia, is significant because of the increase in the strains of drug-resistant bacteria and the few conventional antibiotics being currently developed. “This is an example of taking what nature has given us and trying to understand how it works, so we can modify it to be more potent, more stable or more drug-like, to use as an alternative to what we have in our pharmacy now”. Henriques pointed out.

This research leaded by David Andreu, head of the Proteomics and Protein Chemistry Research Group at UPF, and involving researchers from Australia, Portugal, Brazil and France, was published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry -CS/PRBB-

Reference article:
Pérez-Peinado C, Almeida S, Domingues M, Benfield A, Freire JM, Radis-Baptista G, Gaspar D, M Castanho, Craik D, Henriques S, Veiga A, Andreu D. Mechanism of bacterial membrane permeabilization of crotalicidin (Ctn) and its fragment Ctn[15-34], antimicrobial peptides from rattlesnake venomJournal of Biological Chemistry, February 2018.

More information:
DCEXS website