News
17/5/2013

CREAL: Approaches for modeling exposure to specific trihalomethanes and bladder cancer risk

CREAL: Approaches for modeling exposure to specific trihalomethanes and bladder cancer risk


News from CREAL


Lifetime exposure to trihalomethanes (THM) has been associated with increased risk of bladder cancer. THMs are formed as by-products when chlorine is used to disinfect water for drinking. They are part of a group of chemicals known as disinfection by-products (DBPs) and THMs represent the chemical class of DBPs occurring at highest concentrations. They result from the reaction of chlorine and/or bromine with organic matter present in the water during treatment.

A research at the Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL) lead by Dr. Lucas Salas, in the framework of a project coordinated by Dr. Cristina M. Villanueva, recently published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, has explored methods to analyze bladder cancer risk associated with the 4 main THMs (chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform) as surrogates of DBP mixtures in a case control study conducted in Spain (1998–2001).

More information:
CREAL press release

Reference:
Salas LA, Cantor KP, Tardón A, Serra C, Carrato A, García-Closas R, Rothman N, Malats N, Silverman D, Kogevinas M, Villanueva CM. Biological and Statistical Approaches for Modeling Exposure to Specific Trihalomethanes and Bladder Cancer Risk. Am J Epidemiol 2013 (in Press)