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12/7/2013

CREAL: European study finds long-term exposure to even low levels of air pollution increases risk of lung cancer

CREAL: European study finds long-term exposure to even low levels of air pollution increases risk of lung cancer


News from CREAL


Prolonged exposure to particulate air pollution increases the risk of lung cancer (particularly adenocarcinoma, of the four major histological subtypes of lung cancer that is the only one that also develops in a substantial number of non-smokers) even at levels below the European Union limit values, according to one of the largest studies of its kind published in The Lancet Oncology. Mark Nieuwenhuijsen, researcher and coordinator of the Air Pollution program at CREAL, from the ISGlobal alliance, has participated in this study.

Using data from the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE), coordinated by the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands, the researchers did a meta-analysis of 17 cohort studies in nine European countries including almost 313.000 people. The analysis found that for every increase of 5 micrograms per cubic meter of PM2.5 pollution, the risk of lung cancer rose by 18%, and for every increase of 10 micrograms per cubic meter in PM10 pollution the risk increased by 22%, with stronger effects indicated for adenocarcinomas. No association between lung cancer and nitrogen oxides was noted.

Reference article: "Air pollution and lung cancer incidence in 17 European cohorts: prospective analyses from the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE)", Raaschou-Nielsen et al., The Lancet Oncology, Early Online Publication, 10 July 2013

 

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